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3 incredible low-calorie snacks that satisfy

Sometimes, you just get a craving. Maybe it’s because you forgot to eat breakfast, or perhaps a commercial on TV looked especially appetizing. If you’re trying to eat more nutritiously, snacking may feel like you’re cheating on your diet. However, it actually boasts health benefits, as snacking can keep blood sugar levels in check and prevent you from becoming so hungry you overeat later.

The type of food you reach for is what really matters. The snack food aisle is full of high-calorie options with excessive amounts of fat, cholesterol, sugar, and sodium, all of which can contribute to a host of health issues, from diabetes to cancer. However, there are plenty of low-calorie crunchy snacks that can satisfy your cravings all while allowing you to maintain a healthy eating plan, so opt for these healthy crunchy foods next time a craving hits.

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Emerald 100 Calorie Almonds

Portion control is crucial when eating nutritiously. However, nut brands often make this difficult by using weighted serving sizes (for example, 1 oz. is 130 calories). Unless you carry a scale around, it’s difficult to know for sure how much you’re eating. Emerald takes the guesswork out of the snacking process with its pre-packaged 100 calorie almonds. The almonds boast 6 grams of monounsaturated fats, which reduce the risk of heart issues, decrease inflammation, and can even help you lose weight. They also contain 4 grams of protein and no added sugars so you stay energized without the sugar crash.

Why we like it:

  • Pre-packaged 100-calorie packs make it easy to know how much you’ve consumed
  • Offers 6 grams of monounsaturated fats and 4 grams of protein
  • No added sugars

Seapoint Farms Sea Salt Dry Roasted Edamame

Protein-packed foods can help you lose weight, reduce calorie intake, and increase strength. Seapoint Farms sea salt dry roasted edamame has 14 grams of protein that’s 20 percent of your daily needs. It also has 6 grams of fiber to aid in digestion and gut health and 15 percent of your daily iron needs. Experts say eating an iron-rich diet can also help you battle fatigue and beat the dreaded 3 p.m. slump. This dry-roasted edamame isn’t too salty, making it the perfect pre-workout snack for a quick boost of energy that isn’t dehydrating.

Why we like it:

  • Contains 20% of daily protein needs
  • Contains 15% of daily iron needs
  • 6 grams of fiber aid digestion and gut health

Apple pears

Fruits are called nature’s candy for a reason. They’re loaded with natural sugar and fiber, and this fiber promotes slower digestion, keeping you fuller longer. If you’re craving something crunchy, opt for apple pears. Target sells a three-pack of apple pears — which offer the sweet taste of pears with the crunch of apples — and you may be able to get same-day delivery or pick it up within two hours.

Why we like it:

  • Promotes slower digestion to keep you full longer
  • Loaded with natural sugar and fiber
  • Mixes the sweet taste of pairs with the crunchy texture of apples

Healthy crunchy foods are a great way to satisfy cravings, reduce hunger, and prevent you from overeating later in the day. Keep in mind that not all snacks are created equal, so look for foods that are high in protein and fiber that keep you full, strong, and energized. While you’re at it, fill up on monounsaturated fats, like those found in nuts such as almonds, which can help you lose weight and reduce inflammation. By keeping these snacks on hand, you can banish hunger pains for good and keep up your healthy, balanced diet.

BlissMark provides information regarding health, wellness, and beauty. The information within this article is not intended to be medical advice. Before starting any diet or exercise routine, consult your physician. If you don’t have a primary care physician, the United States Health & Human Services department has a free online tool that can help you locate a clinic in your area. We are not medical professionals, have not verified or vetted any programs, and in no way intend our content to be anything more than informative and inspiring.

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